Thursday, October 27, 2016

Dog Medical Emergencies: Take the Survey

Do you know when sickness or injury constitutes an emergency? Which signs and symptoms should have you burning rubber on the way to a vet?

Create your own user feedback survey

36 comments

  1. We are keeping our paws crossed that we never have to burn rubber to any vet or hospital.

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    1. Yes, paws crossed for you too. Having to do that sucks.

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  2. Important info every pet parent should know!

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    1. Thank you, Nichole. It's mind-boggling how often people are staring at an emergency and have no clue.

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  3. Comprehensive survey - hope you'll post the results too or incorporate them into a blog post.

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    1. I will definitely post the results and, by the looks of it so far, some further notes and explanations.

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  4. A very important post, for sure. I love the survey, very clever and helpful tool to decide what situations require an emergency trip and which can wait until the next day.

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    1. I know that all of you guys reading blogs such as this know your emergencies. Though I see there are couple not everybody would recognize as such, so I will elaborate more on those.

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  5. The survey is a great reminder of what to watch out for. We have only had a few emergencies over the years, thank goodness.

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    1. I'd prefer to hear you guys didn't have any emergencies. But most pet parents do have some over the lifetime of their pets, unfortunately.

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  6. I volunteer for a free vet clinic and I am constantly shocked at the disturbing ideas people have of what constitutes an emergency- both on the "my cat desperately needs help because she has started only sitting on my lap for six hours a day instead of eight" and the "my dog hasn't been able to stand up for three days, is that normal?" sides of the coin. In turn, I constantly question myself for either being too quick to rush off to the vet or doing too much "wait and see."

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    1. I think the other end of the spectrum is way worse. I'd rather have somebody rush to the emergency with that than not rush to the emergency with a pet bleeding out of every orifice. And there are a lot of people out there Googling at times like that.

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  7. I loved the idea of a survey. Have worked at a vet clinic and i am so appalled by some people and their perceptions of an emergency with their animals that they dont see the warning signs like lethargy, loss of appetite consistently etc

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    1. Sometimes you read what people are posting looking for help online and want to run a bullet through your brain. I'm hoping to help change that.

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  8. Brilliant idea doing the survey, am very blessed to have an amazing Vet clinic where before stressing Layla and running there I can call or email them and they then tell me if its an emergency or not

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    1. Yes, being able to call is very helpful.

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  9. Very interesting survey! I had to think about some of those. In my opinion, just because something is concerning and requires a trip to the vet doesn't mean that it is an emergency. I define an emergency as a medical problem for which minutes or hours could be the difference between life and death. Therefore, a bit of diahreah can wait until my vet can fit me in tomorrow, but a severe cut is an emergency.

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    1. I threw in some non-emergencies to make it a bit more challenging. There are couple there, where minutes matter and seems not everybody would recognize as an emergency.

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  10. I just tool the survey and I think I did a pretty good job - what's amazing is over the years there are so many of these issues I've had to address.... so at least I've learned alot... this reminded me that I need to make sure our pet sitter is well versed.

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    1. I'm sure you did a great job. Pet sitters too should know exactly what constitutes an emergency and what doesn't.

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  11. Looking forward to seeing the results of the survey. Mom Paula has burned rubber once with Brulee last year and hopes she doesn't need to do it again any time soon.

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    1. I hope she doesn't have to do that ever again.

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  12. I am curious to see the results along with the correct answers!

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  13. I'm looking forward to the results of your survey. I have only had to rush to the emergency vet once. My yorkie-poo was attacked by another dog and nearly died. We were very grateful to have veterinary care in an after-hours emergency.

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    1. So sorry about that. Yes, that was a real emergency. OFten people don't realize, though, that even if the animal seems to look fine (after a fight, attack, or being hit by car etc) it does not meat they are fine.

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  14. I probably err on the side of overworrying.

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    1. That is always the safest. I do that too. Better make a fool out of yourself than miss a life and death situation.

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  15. Good survey! I can wait to see what the results are

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  16. Interesting survey, I did have to think about a couple of them. I'd be interested to see the results of the survey & hear your thoughts as well.
    Love & Biscuits,
    Dogs Luv Us and We Luv Them

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    1. Couple of them are tricky and I threw in some non-emergencies so it wouldn't be as easy as just checking all of them :-)

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  17. Loss of appetite is especially scary for me. I always know something is WAY off when that happens. (Although the one time when my senior cat wasn't eating enough and I took her to the vet for all sorts of tests that turned out to be normal, and we were all dumbfounded, it turned out she just didn't like he food I was feeding. I figured it out when I caught her sneaking and gobbling the foster kitten's food.) I checked a lot of boxes on that survey.

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    1. Loss of appetite truly can mean something very serious. And with cats, not eating itself is dangerous. That kind of thing is circumstantial, though. For example, Jasmine, with her IBD would often not be interested in food. Sometimes it would resolve on its own, sometimes it needed help but other than one time it was not an emergency. Can be, though, particularly if one doesn't know what other signs to check for such as high fever, pale gums and things like that.

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  18. My humans were in this exact situation this summer with me! It was on a weekend of course and these spent the entire weekend debating whether they sound call the emergency number or what until Monday morning. I wouldn't want anyone to be in this situation!!!

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    1. Tough situations. I'm glad all worked out well for you.

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